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How do I use oobping to diagnose authentication problems?

Article:
00820
Last Reviewed:
28th October 2008
Revision:
2

Once you are sure a connection can be made to the OOB Server with oobping you can check OOB Server authentication.

The -u and -p arguments to oobping allow you to specify a valid operating system username and password.

Note If you have disabled authentication in the OOB Server then whatever username and password you specify should work.

Note If the usernames or passwords you are using contain spaces or characters that the shell might interpret you should enclose them in single quotes (UNIX) or double quotes (Windows).

Note The values specified with -u and -p are equivalent to the OOB Client DSN attributes LogonUser and LogonAuth. For example:

oobpings -h myserver -t 8888 -u 'A User' -p 'mypassword'
Host: myserver, Port: 8888
Attempting connection...OK
Examining Server...
    OOB Server Version: 1.1.0.00
    OOB Server Name: OOB
Trying to authenticate...OK

If there is something wrong with the username or password the output will look something like this:

oobpings -h myserver -t 8888 -u 'A User' -p 'mypassword'
Host: myserver, Port: 8888
Attempting connection...OK
Examining Server...
    OOB Server Version: 1.1.0.00
    OOB Server Name: OOB
Trying to authenticate...Fail
Authentication failure (error number 1326)

In this case the error returned by the remote username/password authentication service is 1326 (as the server was on Windows, this is a Windows error code). You can look up all the common error codes in this knowledge base article.

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